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20121027
20121104
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. one of my clarion -- four years ago i talked at clarion which is a wonderful science-fiction five week-long six weeklong boot camp and teachers come in and go a week and i did week 4 which i was told was when everybody cries and others break down. they did not have nervous breakdowns which was great. at one point, one of my guys -- can you tell whether your letters going to make it? and i said no. and some of us are brilliant and some of us -- how do you tell? no. ones who are going to make are the ones who write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant may have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in and they write every day and finish their stories and then write the next one they will make it. i saw him four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award and he said you know, it works. he didn't get the award but still very proud of him. my wife and i loved the audio versions and never worked. you are such a terrific voice actor. did you have those voices in mind as you were writing the book? i suppose i did but also ha
to measure in science and engineering when they go to college they're much less likely to get what they call stem degrees in the science and engineering and math degrees if they receive a large preference. a study by friends of mine at the university of virginia found that if you take to students of any color one of whom received a large preferences and one of whom doesn't, the student with a preference has about 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on his path through. the mismatch also affects if with academically inclined students that receive large preferences who with like to become university professors or going to academics sunday, but very predominantly receive low academic grades, clustered at the bottom of the class and decide that academics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experience was in california where the voters passed proposition and we had a large cause i national experiment about what happens when racial preferences are banned from the entire system. the results are extremely clear 21 the bothers. within a half-dozen on the neutrality the number of blacks in
. susan mchale, director of the social science research institute and one of the corps organizers of the network is here with us today. can you please stand and be recognized? thank you. [applause] >> we also made a pledge to educate our university community about ethics. it is one thing to know the rules, regulations and policies. it is another thing to create a culture where every employee wants to do the right thing the first time everytime. through training and awareness building efforts, we are trying to help people understand the how, when, where and why of reporting. i assure you can state takes this commitment very seriously. that is not a glib promised. to prove it we have stepped up our efforts and compliance. like most universities and state has dozens of compliance professionals. they are responsible for insuring research funds are appropriately used. they monitor our ncaa compliance, financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting and administer many more regulations related to the health, welfare and safety of those on camp
other. >> well, if you look at the university level, the u.s. is still the predominant science and engineering engineer in the world. if you were quantitatively come look at all kinds of dissonance on the numbers because a very large engineering graduation rate in some curlers countries, particularly china. but there's a lot of dispute about what the numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, science and engineering in the u.s. and university level are so predominant in the world, though other countries are catching up as others have said because the u.s. was the only man left standing are the only person left standing at the end of world war ii and has a free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 is concerned, things are quite different. do you have huge disparity in quality, even with a few 50 miles or so, i think we were sitting today you can probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, k-12 and terrible quality. and that's a microcosm of the u.s. as a whole, which has huge inequalities in k-12 education system. so its average performance on all t
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
in science and engineering when they go to college they're less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study from the university of virginia found if you take two blacks or students of any color who one receives a large preference and one doesn't, the one that receives preference has a larger chance of dropping out. "mismatch" also affects academically inclined students who receive large preference who like to become university professors or academics. but predominantly receive low academic grades and decide economics is not for them. the biggest "mismatch" experiment was in california where voters passed a proposition with a large experiment of what happened when racial preferences are banned from university systems. it is extremely clear for anyone who played cares to look. within a half-dozen years the number of blacks in the university system has gone up by 30%. the number of blacks receiving a bachelor degrees went up by 70%. the number of degrees for hispanics, gpas of gone up. virtually every outcome has been a dramatic improvement. the colu
a science fiction five-week long, six-week long science-fiction boot camp. and i did week four, which is when everyone cries and has a nervous breakdown spirit and they did indeed do that. which was great. [laughter] at one point, one of my guys said how can you tell? can you tell which of us is going to make it. and i said no. he said, but some of us are brilliant, and can you tell? and i said no. the ones that are going to make it would be the ones that write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant have written brilliant stories and never write again, they are the ones who get in there and write everyday and finish their stories. then they write the next ones. and they will make it. i saw him about four months ago in arlington. he was nominated for a nebula award and he said, you know, it works. he didn't get the award, but still very proud of him. [laughter] my wife and i love this very much. thank you very much. i also like to cheat on the voices because of the ones i like are in the tv series. the ones i didn't like, i substituted the ones that were in my head. wh
to have a really sound science before you make those difficult decisions. you know, i am a scientist. i have been taking care patients for 30 years. and i know that you don't change an operation that you do because some people have said that this new operation is a lot better. all right. you need to have years of unbiased will result before you make a critical decision that affect people's lives. frankly, i have not been convinced us what the real facts are. and i certainly don't know that we should be spending trillions of dollars over science that is argued about. because i have been through this before. i have seen people tout the medical theory, saying how great it was and see people act on that end the disastrous results. and i don't want to do that in the field of global warming. >> moderator: thank you. mr. mcdowell, you have one minute. mcdowell: i just look at the scientific issues. this should be an issue based solely on the science of the issue. right now, our legs have dropped about 20 inches in the last 10 years. i looked across the bigger and it really frightens me. i don'
's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do better in verbal scores. it starts early in life and that is largely a development question. we demand a lot more of younger and younger children and girls develop faster than boys. that is where it starts and people say boys get a sense of themselves as a little bit of failures in school. not because they're less smart. boys and girls are equally smart. it has to do with extra issues like discipline and can you sit still and what schools are demanding of kids comes more naturally to girls than boys. i have an addendum to that i will get into in a minute and then you move to community college and other college and for every two degrees men get women get three degrees. that is a huge disparity. they reached parity about the 80s and since t
. our site is doing it because their cars get keyed and science get torn down. >> hi, my name is harry. i love your passion and your honesty all these years. i've seen you on media. and david, i admire him so deeply. mainly for that day she was going be campuses and taking them on right there in those places. i was a student in 1965 at kersten university and i was drawn by democrats into democrats into wanting to help take care of people are hearing the clarence thomas hearings, i switched to republican. the >> that's great. >> after the republicans inability to prosecute clinton all the way, i let them and became an independent and decided that was the best place i could find. i loved what you said about the courage of the black conservative. that's the subject i've been drawn to from the very beginning. it was in my heart in those days as a student, when i was in the march to montgomery, where it all got started. >> is this leading to question? >> i have value of my own, too. i wanted you to comment on the person of thomas soul if you don't mind. [applause] >> i think is the greatest
of the social science research institute and a co-organizer of the research is here today. susan, can you please stand to be recognized? thank you. [applause] we also made a pledge to educate the university community about ethics. it's one thing to know the rules, regulations, and policies; it's another thing to create a culture where every employeements to do the right thing the first time every time. through training and awareness building efforts, we're trying to help people understand the how, when, where, and why of reporting. i assure you that penn state takes this commitment very seriously. that's not a glib promise. to prove it, we stepped up efforts in compliance. like most universities, penn state has dozens of compliance professionals. they're responsible for ensuring research funds are appropriately used, they monitor the nca compliance, the financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting, and they administer regulations related to the health, welfare, and safety of those on campuses including our patients. what we've discovered, however, i
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
impossible, if you're a political science major at any university, to take a course in the federalist papers--or in law school school, for that matter. you'd think law school would be interested in finding out what the founders really thought. but, no, there are no courses in the federalist papers, or at least not many, either in law schools or in political science departments. c-span: why do you think--let--what's--how important were the federalist papers? >> guest: well, i think if you want to understand the political philosophy of the founders, they're very important. i mean, what else do you have to go by? you have to go by the arguments that they proposed for the ratification of the constitution. i mean, this was their explanation of why the constitution should be adopted. you have the debates of the constitutional convention, plus the federalist papers, plus, i guess, the ratification proceedings in the various states. but the federalist papers are so brilliantly written, largely by madison, some by jay, and are full of so much political wisdom that i really feel that as part of a--an
a republican to of the science union over antagonism. then we can could see any republican future beyond the border. he did later on. as for the unity of the triumph of the republican party since the inception seward had been a major spokesmen for anti-slavery number weighed this from the irrepressible conflict and had to rappel from the assault on the left and the party asking for compromise did even if the most radical did vote they would offset the loss. sell it would become the great union party and as i said lincoln did turn that party etfs before the hostilities did not. yes he viewed the crisis from the partisan perspective but there was the third fundamental reason. the evidence suggests the visceral hatred of slavery. seward without question never gave slavery equality with free them but convinced with the rapid expansion of the free states with burgeoning economic power this overpowers slavery. to become casualties of what he foresaw as inevitable progress after accomplishing his purpose elected a republican seward was quite willing to stop. not selling 10. the territorial issu
systems to integrate social media and data visualization tools with social science, analysis. his writing has appeared in the asian "wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organizations around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here in gaston hall, dr. kim. [applause] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of co
at being a geek god, filled with again with science and technology. i'm thinking, how can i get better? i had the sensors encompasses a bluetooth. you have phones in your pocket. i'll bet you could actually sort of fly a plane with this. so i got the kids together and they put it in the plane. it turns out the autopilot starts regulating the state department and can be recognizable by go that day. but what that may be realized is that there's something very exciting going on in what used to be hard to do stuff, electronics and others, others, others, my little discovery in terms of my children got me into the recognition that may be hardwired, maybe physical stuff was something i could do and it was interesting and scary anymore. so i started messing around and learning a little bit and we got a computer board have learned more about sensors and kind of what way down rabbit hole. today i run a chunk from any with a mexican drone factory. i'll say it again, mexican drone in fact true. five years ago i was the dad messing around at the park with my kids and i would put montrose in the earth
compromise won't trust science, won't work at all. we're seeing that. so i believe there will be a change in our recent cross the aisle. i did before. we can do that. i come from a republican family. the problem is we have a very right-wing group in washington right now that will not compromise. >> moderator: mr. guinta, one minute. guinta: first, she blames the tea party. i'm undergoing different tv station she found herself agreeing with the tea party and says she agrees with many principles of the tea party, so you can't have it both ways. secondly, the freshman class was elected around the country because the congress who served in the spending and borrowing out of control and passing legislation that the country didn't want. the countries that enough in 2010. so here's always done in the house. firstly we did was cut her own budgets. the second day we did was vote to repeal the affordable carrots, something the country wanted us to do. the third thing was stop earmarks. the fourth thing we did was freeze congressional pay. and then went into the bipartisan work with more than dirty d
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
to serve so that one man ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam burt ended up setting up his own nonprofit. serve with habitat for humanity. a youth hockey coach in football coach. it at the mission continues and did an in the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. it ended up becoming a biology teacher for part of her. and what happened was for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finding a way to continue to serve on their new frontline. and what we found ed the mission continues is that all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people are around the country. and i finished the book, i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. you don't -- your own life feels fill the possibility. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your ventures. the road before you is long. you will wind up steep hills and down to low valleys. there will be moments of spectacular beauty along the way and
. find a way to continue to serve so that josh ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam, who was hit by the mortar round set up his own nonprofit. julian served with habitat for humanity, sean became a youth hockey coach and football coach. ian smith did a fellowship at the police continues and then did an internship and the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. melissa steinman became a biology teacher, and for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finds a way to continue to serve on the new front line. and what we found at the mission continues, is all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people around the country. and i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. your own life feels filled with possibilities. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your adventure. the road before you is long. it will wind up steep hills and down into low valleys. moments of spectacular beauty
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
subsidies anymore. the national academy of sciences has said that any level of radiation from a nuclear power plant is dangerous to our health. so we need to be moving forward. the costs of nuclear power are socialized, and the health care costs that we have are people that are exposed to radiation. i do support, i support governor cuomo's efforts and to support a transition to renewable clean energy economy, and save economy that does not rely on fossil fuels or nuclear power. >> moderator: dan maffei, would you support what the governor wants to do by closing indian point? maffei: there's no question we have to get to work towards a clean energy a comic book we're doing a lot of that research right here in central new york, our universities or at the clean tech center, at the tech garden. in terms of nuclear power, well, we do need to make sure that nuclear power is safe and make sure that it's environmentally sound. i'm not sure we done that yet, but it wouldn't get rid of it until a gotten rid of coal and oil first. oil that we're dependent on other countries for, that we are behold
it's science, it's math, and it's urgent. thank you. >> moderator: you're welcome. talk about health care. moving on to another question, and starting with you, this time, mr. dalton. affordable care act provides candidates teases to affordable health care to millions of americans. critics say it's expensive, takes money from medicaid, and pushes government on people. what do you like or not like about the affordable care act? dalton: access to affordable care is what i like, and what's wrong with the -- what happened here is that the two parties again, democrats and republicans, who i hope i replace by more independents so they are held accountable to be in the pockets of major lobbyists, they doabts come to reform when it comes to the major issues. to allow major lobby groups like big pharmaceuticals, the u.s. chamber of congress, ama, and even aarp, to get in the room and force them to make requirements that are not for the best interest of the people, the reason we have a mandate was because that was forced down their throat. the reason we have -- we don't have a public option, w
discussion than science to talk about climate change. we don't know what a correct temperature is. but i do believe that there is a valid role for the federal government in protecting unownable resources. so i do peeve that there is a very -- believe that there is a very strong role that is not being played out at all right now. crony capitalism has made it awfully difficult for people to actually seek some kind of compensation for when a company builds, you know, a plant right next to your farm and starts belching smoke into it. we should have more recourse than we do in courts of law. unfortunately, the taxation regulation that these guys have been giving us for the last hundred years have made it difficult to hold large corporations accountable because they are, of course, the biggest campaign contributors. we should be following the money on this and not thinking it's inconsequential if you have millions and now billions and trillions of dollars going into campaigns. do we think that that does not come without strings? and when it comes to environment, that's serious. >> moderator: than
are making a big effort to apply science to this redeployment. um, when will you have completed the agreements with the stans, the central asian republics? >> there are some treaty sensitivities there, clearly, but i am confident that by the end of this year or early next year that will be delivered. >> right. um, and do you think norton will be able to cope with the withdrawal? >> yes, i do. there's work going on in prize norton, but it's also about ports of entry as well as airports of entry. so this is a national effort in terms of the site of this. what i do is make sure that the redeployment of equipment will not in any way hinder the military operation that equipment is supposed to support. so there's an equilibrium here about supporting transition right through to 2013 and the end which you've heard us describe and how much equipment we can take out. and that's a fine balance which we address and scrutinize on a regular basis. >> so if norton is not itself going to be i pose one would call it -- i suppose one would call it a pinch point or something, are there any other b
in washington, d.c.. he received his bachelor of science in civil engineering from the universities of cairo, and masters of international law from the university of paris, and this is quite fitting because in the arab world with one out of three of all arabs being egyptians, egyptians have participated in and leading representatives in international organizations in more than any other country in the arab world, and, indeed, one egyptian became the secretary general of the united nations. please join me in welcoming mohamed taufik. [applause] >> good afternoon, everyone. i'd like to start by thanking dr. anthony for your kind introduction and kind invitation for me to be here today. particularly, i'd li to thank you fo the fantastork you an the council have be doing to promote relations between the ited states and the ash world. these relations are vital f the interest of both paies, and i look forward to continue to cooperation and continued efforts to promote these relations. i feel i have a special role being the first ambassador of egypt after the revolution to the united states. it's a
it said redaction is then made. and we often found that this was not a science. someone said this morning, it was a mathematical. it is hard. and you will have people disagree even within the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. we would get very significant reductions. give it to another person, much less significant, and it would argue with each other as to what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply with a broad stroke redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why it would harm the national security which is the standard. by pushing back the information in the public that it turned out to be was not able to be released and give the public and insight on what was happening within the agency. inside having access and permission we have the ability and roll that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government because you know what is happening within the agency. you know where the bodies are buried. you know how th
don't know whether that's because of how computer science is conducted in universities or, you know, i'm not with larry summers. i think it's also showed and not physical. but on the other financial literacy, we didn't address that here because were only looking at earnings and not as income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets and that includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts in stocks and bonds, all financial assets, which is to say every asset in the economy except homes, art and gold or whatever are held by the top 20% of the country. the bottom 80% control 70% of the value of all financial assets. so, that financial literacy in the top 20% and probably does have an effect on income
that they made. and we often found that this is not a science. someone said this morning it isn't mathematical. well, it is an art. you'll have people disagreeing with in the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. it gives one person for example, in the fbi, the report that we would get. very significant reductions. we would give to another person, much less significant reductions in the derby with each other as to what could be released. we felt strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with broad strokes, redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why would harm the national security. which is the standard, after all. by pushing back, we often got much information out into the public that it turned out was able to be released and gave the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. i believe that being within the agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseen. you know wh
level you could take that would reduce a lot of this. it is not rocket science. you need a password management program. do you accept collect calls from russia? [laughter] >> because that happens. this is a good example. this is like the classic cyberstory. springfield water supply system, i told people, remember that springfield is where homer simpson was. they get hacked,. >> is this a real story? >> yes. it turned out it wasn't hacked from it turns out that a contractor called in and he used his password to take control and call him from russia. this is sort of a no-brainer security measure. the correct answer to his accepting security causes no. there are simple things we can do that would make it better. >> does anyone else have a question? >> i was happy to hear mr. lewis conclude with the idea of a digital pearl harbor. we have heard quite a bit recently, including from senator lieberman in "the new york times" about the overwhelming threat of that kind of attack compared to the more minimal lower-level stuff you are talking about now. i would appreciate hearing both of your
even the after with political reform. that our science the other element elements in national community they are getting weary of this conflict. the turks i think are a little weary right now. there've been some comments even from the obama administration, shifting from the manichaean view towards assad. so all of these scenarios don't present too much of a pretty picture, and, obviously, lead to more death and destruction in the near term but, unfortunately, there are no easy answers to this. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. we have two respondents. we have paul sullivan, professor of economics, national defense university as was agenda professor in the security studies program at georgetown university. will ask and become first and then lastly we'll have ambassador take the tooth, president and ceo of america-mideast education and training. spent i have not been more torn of the situation were longtime that the situation in syria. this is a serious business. now, when people mentioned soft power, i think there may be some of get the impression that this is having peace on
that this is not a science. so and of this work it wasn't mathematical. it is in part. and you'll have people disagreeing come even within the agency, about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. you give it to one person and for sample in the fbi, the report, and we would get a very significant reduction. would give it to another person, much less significant redactions and they would argue with each other as what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with a broad strokes, redacted all sorts of information from the report, that they need to justify why would harm national security, which is the standard after all. by pushing back we often got much information out in the public that it turned out wasn't able to be released into the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. and maybe that thing with any agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government. because you know w
? climate change has not gotten talked-about rehab this whether in this science is overwhelming you don't see it on the nightly news to say we have to cover this war? one was the environment every time we tried to do a prime-time special meehan leonardo dicaprio interview president clinton and i was killed for it. we did the prime-time special he was the chairman of earth day i thought he would make an appearance be interviewed the president. that was the attempt. but we did more tears them coverage before 9/11. we did a prime-time special but the military said the biggest concern it is enacted of terrorism of. i wish we had done more. education is not covered in the depth that it should be. some of our difficult to do with television. >> host: how much pressure is there to do entertainment as news? lindsay lohan or the superficiality? to seem that journalism has gone down is there pressure what is the news? >> there was the disagreement with princess diana coverage after she died and peter said it was a terrible idea but then came around. it was a constant battle within myself and is a
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)